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What to know about drinking alcohol

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Of Fred EzeAbuja

More and more, many people are increasingly supportive of alcohol, and consumption has also continued to rise. Some people consume alcohol in a “raw” form, while others choose to enjoy it in a processed form.

Nevertheless, it is very possible to find many people these days who consume alcohol but know little or nothing about its effects on their body.

During Yuletide, which is often accompanied by revelry, alcohol is used at virtually every social or cultural event, exposing young people to alcohol consumption long before the right time.

It is often written in bold on the containers of different alcoholic beverages that the contents are intended for persons 18 years of age or older. But these days people under the age of 18 drink alcohol recklessly, contrary to brewery or distiller warnings.

Here are some of the basic things to know about alcohol and how it works in the human body. Some of the information below has been taken from different health research reports by health experts. So, before consuming alcohol, you should be able to know the following:

HOW IS ALCOHOL TRANSFORMED IN THE BODY?

Alcohol passes through the digestive system. It does not undergo extensive digestion in the digestive tract in the same way as food. When it enters the upper gastrointestinal tract, a significant portion is absorbed directly into the bloodstream through the lining of the stomach and small intestine. Once in the bloodstream, it is carried throughout the body and travels to the brain.

The absorption mechanism may be slightly slowed down when there is food in the stomach. Food can absorb alcohol, prevent it from coming into contact with the stomach lining, or slow its transit from the stomach to the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. Otherwise, the alcohol is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO

THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL TO DROP?

A healthy person will usually feel the effects of alcohol within 15 to 45 minutes. Most men with minimal or no tolerance will begin to exhibit some characteristics of intoxication when their blood alcohol level (BAC) reaches 0.05%, and their ability to drive will be significantly impaired at 0.07%. At 0.10%, they will be clearly intoxicated.

Similarly, a woman who weighs 150 pounds will reach a blood alcohol level of 0.1% (intoxication) if she consumes about four drinks of alcohol in an hour.

HOW LONG DOES ALCOHOL STAY IN THE BODY’S SYSTEM?

Alcohol is primarily broken down by the liver, which can process about one standard alcoholic drink per hour for men. However, factors such as age, weight, gender, and amount of food can affect how quickly the body can process alcohol. It is important to note that the rate of alcohol absorption cannot be increased by sleeping or drinking water.

Additionally, alcohol can remain in the body system for six to 72 hours in most cases, depending on the detection test used. Alcohol tests can measure alcohol in the blood for up to six hours, in the breath for 12 to 24 hours, in the urine for 12 to 24 hours (72 hours or more with alcohol detection methods more advanced), in saliva for 12 to 24 hours and hair for up to 90 days. The half-life of alcohol is between four and five hours.

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN YOU ARE DRUNK?

The higher your blood alcohol level, the more likely you are to show signs of intoxication, which may include reduced inhibitions, slurred speech, impaired coordination, confusion, impaired memory, difficulty concentrating and breathing problems (eg, decreased breathing effort, respiratory depression), among many others.

People who are intoxicated are also more prone to road accidents, risky behaviors such as unprotected sex, violence, suicide and homicide.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO GET A BODY SYSTEM DRINK?

Alcohol is primarily broken down in the liver by the action of an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase. On average, the liver can process one standard drink per hour for men, or about 0.015g/100ml/hour (i.e. a reduction in BAC, or BAC, of ​​0.015 per hour). In addition to liver processing, approximately 10% of alcohol is eliminated through sweat, breath and urine.

FACTORS THAT AFFECT ALCOHOL DROP

Several factors can influence the rate at which alcohol breaks down in the body system, including age, weight, gender, metabolism, amount of food consumed by the person, type and strength of alcohol. alcohol and, in some cases, if the person has taken medication.

DOES DRINKING WATER OR COFFEE HELP SORRY?

The breakdown and elimination of alcohol cannot be accelerated by drinking water or sleeping, and neither coffee nor the shower will sober you up any faster. They might make you more alert, but they won’t remove alcohol from your bloodstream. As long as your drinking rate is higher than your elimination rate, your blood alcohol level will continue to rise.

WHEN IS ALCOHOL NO LONGER DETECTED DURING A TEST?

The length of time that alcohol can be detected in your system depends on the type of test used. Blood lasts up to six hours, breathalyzer lasts 12-24 hours, saliva also lasts 12-24 hours, urine also lasts 12-24 hours for older test methods; 72 hours or more for newer methods that test for ethanol metabolites such as ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate.

Since alcohol is metabolized quite quickly, most clinicians rely on observations of alcohol use such as slurred speech or the smell of alcohol or a breathalyzer to confirm intoxication or recent consumption.

HOW MUCH ALCOHOL CAN KILL A PERSON?

An overdose of alcohol, or alcohol poisoning, can have serious negative effects on a human being. You can overdose when there is enough alcohol in your system to dangerously slow or stop vital functions such as breathing or heart rate.

As your blood alcohol level rises, you may begin to experience more of the negative effects of intoxication and your risk of overdose increases. For example, a blood alcohol level of 06% to 0.15% could cause moderate impairment in speech, memory, attention, coordination and balance; driving ability significantly impaired.

16% to 0.30% BAC can lead to significant impairment of speech, memory, attention, balance, reaction time and coordination; dangerously impaired driving ability; impaired judgment and decision-making; risk of breakdowns; vomiting; loss of consciousness, while a blood alcohol level of 31% to 0.45% could lead to the risk of life-threatening overdose and risk of death from suppression of breathing, heart rate and body temperature.

RISKS OF ALCOHOL ABUSE

Alcohol-related deaths are the third leading cause of preventable death in some countries around the world, with thousands of people dying each year from liver failure, overdose, drunk driving and other related accidents.

As alcohol consumption continues to be a widespread and life-threatening national public health crisis, it’s important to know that help is just a phone call away. If you or someone you know abuses alcohol or has an alcohol addiction, please seek help from those affected as soon as possible.

Knowing more about how alcohol is metabolized and tracking your probable blood alcohol level can help you prevent unintentional overintoxication and accidental death from alcohol poisoning.

Additionally, understanding the dangers of alcohol can also help avoid a cycle of increasing tolerance, physical dependence, and ultimately a compulsive pattern of problematic drinking that results in the development of addiction.

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