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JPS goes virtual due to water pressure

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The Jackson Public School District will conduct school virtually Jan. 5-6 due to low or no water pressure at 33 schools.

City of Jackson officials said Wednesday they are still working to put more pressure on the city’s drinking water system before they can lift the boil water advisory. Most of the city has been under a boil water advisory for the past 10 days since Christmas morning after sub-freezing temperatures once again destroyed the city’s distribution system.

JPS officials said the computer devices will be available for pickup Jan. 4 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at each school. Breakfast and lunch will be available for pickup on January 5 and 6 at each school from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. The announcement comes as students prepare to return from their winter break.

“The loss of water pressure in our school communities has had a huge impact on all of us,” the press release reads.

JPS serves more than 18,000 students in the capital, and chronic water pressure issues have often forced schools to turn to virtual learning. In September 2022, the neighborhood went virtual for a week during the water crisis that left residents without clean water or reliable water pressure for an extended period. District officials previously told Mississippi Today that each student receiving a device through federal COVID relief funds has also been beneficial in addressing water pressure issues, allowing them to transition more easily to virtual instruction.

The news release says the district will continue to monitor updates from the City of Jackson and provide daily updates to families regarding the reopening of schools.

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Julia, originally from Louisiana, covers K-12 education. Previously, she was an investigative intern for Mississippi Today, helping cover the welfare scandal. She graduated in 2021 from the University of Mississippi, where she studied journalism and public policy and was a member of the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College. She has also been published in the New York Times and the Clarion-Ledger.

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